The Four Most Unusual Wireless Microphones

dolphin microphone

Four of the strangest, most extreme, or most durable wireless mics from around the world, and into the future. And yes, the dolphin picture is relevant.  

 

google-tattooFrom Motorola patent application

Throat Tattoo Wireless Mic 

We discovered this one a few weeks back. Google subsidiary Motorola Mobility filed a patent for a wireless microphone and transceiver that can be tattooed onto the throat of the wearer. The patent reads: “The electronic skin tattoo can include an embedded microphone; a transceiver for enabling wireless communication with the MCD [mobile communication device]; and a power supply configured to receive energizing signals from a personal area network associated with the MCD” 

I know what you’re thinking: Finally! 

 

Tapshoe wireless microphone

Tapshoemic

No longer will the bladed heels of a raging tap shoe terrorize our boom operators! Enter the TapShoeMic, from Q5X. This ultra-specific piece of gear is billed as the “smallest professional broadcast quality wireless microphone transmitter.” It fits right underneath the shoe and tags along for the ride. It’s small enough that it even requires an external software interface, since buttons would be too small to comfortably operate. Its light weight, sturdy build, and top quality audio makes sure you capture each and every nuance of a dance solo.  

 

3323

AQUA-20/20

Making a wireless microphone that can be submerged and resurface completely unharmed is no small task. This is what the Aqua 20/20 special projects audio has accomplished. It’s very popular with pool aerobics instructors and theme park entertainers, like dolphin trainers. It uses a special housing to withstand complete submersion, and maybe even the occasional hit from a dead mackerel!

 

 

 

Mr. Microphone

This 1979 classic toy delivered the magic of wireless audio to children and adults around the world for the low low price of only $14.88. Mr. Microphone used a simple FM transmitter and whip antenna to send a signal to a nearby radio of your choice. Just tune the dial till you hear your own voice, and hope you can get a few words in before the feedback hits. 

 

 

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